Kombucha tips #25

Day 25: Cleaning the stove top

This is the 25th post to the 30 ways with kombucha in 30 days that I have decided to take up for the month of September. You may read more about the ‘challenge’ I gave myself here. 

Hate cleaning up? You’re not alone.

I’m gonna rant a little on this post. I hate cleaning my stove. I love cooking and eating the food I prepare. But I absolutely hate cleaning up. The husband knows it. We’ll always postpone the cleaning to later, after the show, or maybe tomorrow. Dirty stove top with stains, I’m guilty of it.

By now most of you would’ve known how much I hate the smell of chemicals. Maybe I’m a little obsessive compulsive. Every time  I spray these chemicals to clean my kitchen, I open all windows wide and turn the hood on to absorb as much of those chemical fumes as possible. The ammonia makes me feel suffocated. My eyes get teary sometimes. It doesn’t make sense to me that we are so afraid of contaminating the food that we use such harmful cleaners to clean the very area that we prepare our food in.

Think about it, the sprays we use to clean our stove and counter tops, how much chemicals are inside? Did you read the warning label? What happens if we ingest it? If the warning says if we ingest it in large amounts, we need to see a doctor. What happens when we ingest in the small amounts that land on our kitchen stuff as we clean up after our mess? what happens if it gets in our eyes? Or if your kids get their hands on it? Worst still, your pets consume it?

Has it ever occurred to you that these may be the reasons why we have cracked lips or stomach sensitivities due to ingesting the small amounts of these chemicals over long periods of time? Since moving into this home, I’ve tried to keep everything as chemical free as possible. I use enzyme cleaners for the kitchen. However, eco-friendly cleaners are usually more expensive and may or may not fit into the family budget. Its about time to formulate some all natural kitchen cleaner too.

In the last couple of weeks, through all these experimenting, we’ve found that kombucha vinegar works very well in cleaning many areas in the home. I wanted to put this to test on my gunky stove. That’s like THE ultimate test right? IF it can clean the stove, it can clean everything.

Kombucha tips #25

Here’s what you need: 

  • 250ml kombucha
  • 250ml water
  • dish soap/castile soap/black soap
  • 1 spray bottle
  • 2 cleaning cloths
  • 1 non scratch scrub pad
  • baking soda, optional

How to: 

  1. Mix kombucha, water and 2 pumps of soap in a spray bottle. Shake to mix well.
  2. Remove grills and loose parts from stove. Set aside.
  3. Spray liquid generously over stove top. Let sit for 15 mins.
  4. Soak grills, knobs and any other loose parts in basin filled with warm water. Add 1 cup of kombucha vinegar, and 4 pumps of soap of choice. Let it soak while you work on the stove top.
  5. 20140925_160309
  6. Use cloth to wipe off excess liquid on stove top. Use scrub pad to work on tougher stains. Spray more cleaning liquid if needed. For really tough stains, sprinkle baking soda on stain, spray kombucha cleaning mix and let it sit while you clean other parts of the stove.
  7. When you are done with all the stains, rinse first cloth, and wipe thoroughly with cleaned wet cloth. Take 2nd cloth and wipe entire stove top dry.
  8. Now, back to the sink. The soaking solution would have done most of the work by now. I usually just wash through the grills as though I’m washing the dishes. By now, the scrub pad gets whatever stuck on gunk off easily.
  9. Wipe dry with cloth and replace back onto the stove.
  10. And ta da~! No stinky-hurt-your-lungs-chemicals to breathe in. No dry skin on the hands from chemicals.

Tips: Add essential oils if you want cleaning to smell awesome! :)


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Previous articles in the challenge: 

Day 1: All Purpose Spray

Day 2: Soak Produce to Remove Dirt & Bugs

Day 3: Kombucha Coleslaw

Day 4: Hair Rinse

Day 5: Facial Toner 

Day 6: Fermenter’s Overnight Oats

Day 7: All Natural Shower Cleaner

Day 8: Kombucha Vinaigrette

Day 9: Remove the smell our of food jars

Day 10: Using Kombucha to Marinate meats

Day 11: Clean your shower head

Day 12: Make the fluffiest cake

Day 13: Laundry refresher

Day 14 & 15: Kombucha Soap & Carpet Cleaner

Day 16: Kombucha Drain cleaner

Day 17: Kombucha as Antiseptic 

Day 18: Kombucha Cotton Pads

Day 19: Kombucha smoothie

Day 22: Kombucha Fly Trap

Day 23: Cleaning the coffee machine

Day 24: Making Kombucha Tonic

Kombucha Drain Cleaner

Day 16: Kombucha Drain Cleaner

This is the 16th post to the 30 ways with kombucha in 30 days that I have decided to take up for the month of September. You may read more about the ‘challenge’ I gave myself here. 

I hate to do this. We all know how beneficial kombucha is and on 1 hand, I keep feeling like I’m wasting it. Like, literally pouring kombucha down the drain. But after brewing for some time, I’m very sure most of us home brewers experienced this before. We’ve transferred our kombucha, bottled/jar them, and as we go through our daily bottles, when we get to this particular bottle, the first mouthful, we cringe. We taste the sourness in our mouth and flowing down our throats and into our stomach.

That mouthful, makes us wonder whether we could finish the remaining ‘booch in that bottle. Then, this bottle of booch, is perfect for this task.

I did a small test first. 1 tbsp of baking soda, added 1 tbsp of kombucha over it. If it fizzes, its good. If it doesn’t, set it aside and leave it to sit for a couple of weeks more.

I usually set aside the yeasty bits at the bottom of my gallon brew in a small jar and leave them to sour to use for my non-edible tasks. eg, cleaning.

After a week, the KT inside usually gets clearer and the yeasty bits will settle at the bottom, allowing you to use the top for your cleaning spray mixes.

Kombucha Drain Cleaner
Kombucha Drain Cleaner

What you need: 

1 box baking soda. I used Arm & Hammers for this.

Excess kombucha that is too sour to drink.

How to use: 

1) Do the test to be sure the kombucha has the right acidity for this task. If it fizzes with baking soda, its good for this.

2) Pour 1/2 cup of baking soda down the drain hole. Scale baking soda amount according to drain size. Use 1 cup for bigger drains or drains with slight clog.

3) Drizzle 1/2 cup of super sour kombucha over the baking soda and allow it to sit and fizz. Let it sit for about 2 mins and drizzle another cup.

4) Once the liquid starts to flow smoothly, flush drain hole with warm to hot water to rinse it and declog the remain particles that might still be stuck.

5) Done!

This is great for all that excess, sourish kombucha that is almost near to undrinkable. Don’t waste them, give them a purpose! :)

Also, doing this means I never need to go to the super market to fork out dollars for a gallon of vinegar when I have a supply at home that I’m constantly brewing.


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Previous articles in the challenge: 

Day 1: All Purpose Spray

Day 2: Soak Produce to Remove Dirt & Bugs

Day 3: Kombucha Coleslaw

Day 4: Hair Rinse

Day 5: Facial Toner 

Day 6: Fermenter’s Overnight Oats

Day 7: All Natural Shower Cleaner

Day 8: Kombucha Vinaigrette

Day 9: Remove the smell our of food jars

Day 10: Using Kombucha to Marinate meats

Day 11: Clean your shower head

Day 12: Make the fluffiest cake

Day 13: Laundry refresher

Day 14 & 15: Kombucha Soap & Carpet Cleaner

 

Clean carpets with kombucha vinegar

Day 14 & 15 combined: Kombucha Soap & Carpet Cleaner

This is the 14th & 15th post to the 30 ways with kombucha in 30 days that I have decided to take up for the month of September. You may read more about the ‘challenge’ I gave myself here. 

From time to time I will sharing some posts from other sites and other people as well. What started out as a challenge to push myself to find more ways to use kombucha has ended up using more kombucha in experimenting than drinking. I ended up tossing quite a good amount as a result of experiments hat came out bad. I feel so bad for the wastage. But its all for the good for experimenting and sharing what works and what don’t so others don’t have to go through it again.

Yesterday, Day 14 of the challenge, I saw an interesting post in one of the fermenting groups that I am part of online. A lady, Doreen, she made soap out of kombucha. It was a cold processed soap with kombucha, coconut oil, honey and oats. She shared the recipe in our fermenting group at  the Worldwide Share group. The recipe consist of kombucha, coconut oil, honey, oats. All known to be moisturizing and healing for the skin.

Check out her recipe here. Its a closed group, so you will need to be a member of the group to view it. Just click request to join, and I will approve it when I see it. If you do not have a starter culture, do join the group and let us know where you are. We have members all over the world, and we share worldwide, at the cost of postage. If you have specifics that you need or have questions that you’d like to ask, feel free to ask in the group, we are all very open to sharing our knowledge and our ‘culture’ is to share cultures. (pun intended!) :)


 

For today, Day 15 of the challenge, we use kombucha as a carpet cleaner.

Clean carpets with kombucha vinegar
Clean carpets with kombucha vinegar

This works best for fresh stains or spills when its still wet.

What you will need:

1 part Kombucha vinegar, strained to ensure no yeasty bits to clog spray

1 part Plain water

Spray bottle with mist setting

Plenty of towels

How to: 

1) Use a clean cloth/towel to blot out as much liquid as possible. Do not let it sit for too long as the color, stain, and odor may start seeping in.

2) Apply a firm pressure over the towel to absorb as much liquid as possible. Do not rub at the spot as it will spread the stain other areas.

3) Once you get the stain as dry as possible, mist the vinegar  generously over the spot. Let it soak in for 5 to 10 mins.

4) Using clean towels, soak up the vinegar. A little elbow grease needed here! If its a tough stain, rub or scrub, and apply pressure as needed.

5) Again, get as much liquid out as possible, and allow it to dry. The vinegar smell will go away as the liquid dries off.

Be careful with white carpets or clothes, as kombucha is made of tea and may leave a slight yellow stain. If needed, after blotting up kombucha, spray water generously and blot dry again.

Note: If you have a steam cleaner, even better, this can be used in the steam cleaner with 2 parts kombucha to 10 parts water.


 

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Like us on our Facebook page: His Savvy Wife  to receive our latest updates!

Previous articles in the challenge: 

Day 1: All Purpose Spray

Day 2: Soak Produce to Remove Dirt & Bugs

Day 3: Kombucha Coleslaw

Day 4: Hair Rinse

Day 5: Facial Toner 

Day 6: Fermenter’s Overnight Oats

Day 7: All Natural Shower Cleaner

Day 8: Kombucha Vinaigrette

Day 9: Remove the smell our of food jars

Day 10: Using Kombucha to Marinate meats

Day 11: Clean your shower head

Day 12: Make the fluffiest cake

Day 13: Laundry refresher

 

 

Clean your shower head with vinegar

Day 11: Clean your shower head

This is the 11th post to the 30 ways with kombucha in 30 days that I have decided to take up for the month of September. You may read more about the ‘challenge’ I gave myself here. 

I’m so happy to meet new subscribers and meeting new friends asking me questions about these projects I’m putting up. We’ve also been seeing more participation in our Worldwide Share group. I’m really happy to have all of you sharing your recipes and ideas together in the group, and also the newcomers who are starting out on fermenting. Welcome, take it slow, and enjoy the journey. If you have any questions, please post in our facebook group, no question is too simple to ask. To learn well, we need to ask and clarify. If you’re just starting out, you can also request for a culture over there. Most of them are happy to share a portion for you to start at the cost of shipping.

I meant to share another recipe today, but it failed on me. Coming up with 30 different ways of using kombucha is harder than I thought. Its still a good challenge though. Have to bring out the creative sides. Since the start of this project, I must have dumped out about 4 batches of stuff now. I guess this is all part and parcel of experimentation. I’m learning new things everyday through this experimentation. So instead, today, I will be sharing another way I use kombucha/jun vinegar for cleaning the shower heads.

For non fermenters, these recipes for kombucha are interchangeable with Apple Cider Vinegar, fermented jun, or store bought kombucha. However, store bought kombucha will make it much more costly and it will be more beneficial to drink them instead. As with all the ideas I add here, they are meant to help stay frugal while enjoying the other benefits of it. I have used jun in some of the recipes here as well because I have more jun brewing than kombucha. Still trying to get enough scobies out of it.

Clean your shower head with vinegar
Clean your shower head with vinegar

We all have seen it before. Shower heads clogged with mineral deposits after years of build up. Instead of heading out to find yet another product to fulfill this specific need, why not use something you may already have in the kitchen? Doing this way is more eco friendly, and no more worries of stinky chemicals filling up your home.

The acidity from vinegar will dissolve any calcium buildup. There are some methods where you take the shower head apart and boil them in vinegar to let it work more efficiently. But for myself, since I can always set aside some kombucha for cleaning, I prefer to clean it by soaking it overnight. Although its a longer waiting time, but its much less physical work. Perfect for lazy me!

Method:

1) Check your plastic bag for any holes or leaks. I filled mine with tap water first to check for leaks.

2) Fill bag half way through with kombucha/jun vinegar. Try to get a bag just big enough to cover the shower head so that there won’t be wastage.

3) You can either unhook the shower head to tie the bag as I did or you may wrap the bag around the shower head and tie it tightly at the back to hold it in place.

vinegar showerhead

4) As mine is a big and flat shower head, I prefered to tie it this way and let it lay flay on the floor to reach all the holes. With this method, you can leave overnight and let the vinegar work on the shower head, or at least leave it for a couple of hours until you need to use the shower head again.

5) After the soak, remove the bag, use a soft bristle brush to scrub away remaining calcium buildup, and rinse thoroughly.

Do you use vinegar in cleaning your home? What have you used it for?


If you enjoyed this post, share them with your friends with the social buttons on the right.

Like us on our Facebook page: His Savvy Wife  to receive our latest updates!

Previous articles in the challenge: 

Day 1: All Purpose Spray

Day 2: Soak Produce to Remove Dirt & Bugs

Day 3: Kombucha Coleslaw

Day 4: Hair Rinse

Day 5: Facial Toner 

Day 6: Fermenter’s Overnight Oats

Day 7: All Natural Shower Cleaner

Day 8: Kombucha Vinaigrette

Day 9: Remove the smell our of food jars

Day 10: Using Kombucha to Marinate meats

 

 

kombucha tips 9

Day 9: Removing the smell out of food jars.

This is the 9th post to the 30 ways with kombucha in 30 days that I have decided to take up for the month of September. You may read more about the ‘challenge’ I gave myself here. 

Have you ever cooked a pasta dinner, and the pasta sauce came in a very nice glass jar that’s perfect for storing your cookies and what nots. The only thing that’s holding you back? The garlicky, beefy smell that’s coming out from the jar… and it does not go well with your chocolate chip cookies. I had these issues a few times, and the first food I store in these jars, they tend to take after the odor of the previous food.

Kombucha vinegar to the rescue!

kombucha tips 9
Removing the smell out of food jars

I found this by accident when I had a pasta sauce jar that I was keeping to store food. I threw out the first batch of food because the pasta sauce smell overpowered it.

Even after washing multiple times, the odour still stuck. Garlic & beef. I can remember. I left it aside ever since.

A couple of days back, I had some extra kombucha that I had no more mason jars for.

That being my last resort, I poured the kombucha in, and thought, heck, if my kombucha had pizza flavor in it, I’ll just use it for cleaning.

True enough, few days later, the kombucha had the pizza smell. Yes, I used it for cleaning. I sprayed pizza kombucha all over my shower. :)

But…. after cleaning the jar out, the smell was gone. I doubled checked.

Its gone. I now have a jar that I can store whatever I want.

Us, fermenters can never have too many jars right? Now we can reuse all the jars we want!

Have you ever avoid storing food in containers because of the odor it might leave?


 

If you enjoyed this post, share them with your friends with the social buttons on the right.

Like us on our Facebook page: His Savvy Wife  to receive our latest updates!

Previous articles in the challenge: 

Day 1: All Purpose Spray

Day 2: Soak Produce to Remove Dirt & Bugs

Day 3: Kombucha Coleslaw

Day 4: Hair Rinse

Day 5: Facial Toner 

Day 6: Fermenter’s Overnight Oats

Day 7: All Natural Shower Cleaner

Day 8: Kombucha Vinaigrette

 

 

 

kombucha all purpose spray

30 ways with kombucha in 30 days!

kombucha all purpose spray
kombucha all purpose spray

Today marks the first day of the challenge that I have put myself to try. I’ve been drinking kombucha for some time, and am brewing plenty to share with my family. Every once in awhile I have  a batch that I’m unable to get to in time, and I’ll end up having really sour, acidic kombucha that may not be easy to drink. Sometimes I have too much that I have run out of bottles to store.

So for this whole month, I’ve decided to find the different ways I can make use of this probiotic goodness even if they have gone too sour for consumption.  If you’re interested to find out more about kombucha and other ferments, please join my Facebook group: Worldwide Share group for Cultures where I share about what I’m doing and organize projects to share with the group.

I’ve used this all purpose spray to wipe down counters, walls, and my kitchen sink and it works great without the chemicals floating through my house. I would not recommend using this on wood because wood absorbs water. But this is good for non-porous surfaces.

Recipe for Kombucha All Purpose Cleaner

1 part kombucha tea, strained to remove yeasty bits

2 parts distilled water

Shake gently to mix solution. Spray all over surface and wipe clean!

I use this pretty generously, since its much cheaper and safe to use, i.e chemical free.  I don’t have to worry about accidentally digesting it or my chihuahua, Cupid, inhaling it or licking any excess that falls to the floor.

Another great addition to helping me convert my home into an all natural household.

If you like what I’m sharing on this site, please follow my Facebook page: His Savvy Wife to receive updates on what I’ve been doing.